Raymond G. Perelman Center for
Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics

Gadue Laboratory

Paul Gadue

Paul Gadue, PhD

I received my PhD in Immunology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002. My postdoctoral work was with Dr. Gordon Keller, using mouse ES cells as a model system to study directed in vitro differentiation. In 2008 I joined the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and University of Pennsylvania faculty. I am a Stem Cell Biologist, and my research laboratory studies the mechanisms that control the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into functional derivative tissues with a focus on hematopoietic lineages, lung and pancreas. I also co-direct, with Deborah French, the Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Core. This facility provides services and training on the culture and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Our facility also generates human iPS cells from patient samples and performs genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas system.

My laboratory studies cell fate decisions, focusing on endoderm and mesoderm specification using human ES cells and iPS cells. ES/iPS cells can differentiate into all cell types in the body and can be propagated in culture almost indefinitely, generating a virtually unlimited number of cells. These unique characteristics lead to the exciting prospect of using these cells to study disease processes and developmental pathways in vitro and eventually to treat a wide variety of diseases using cell replacement therapies.

The differentiation of ES cells into a given cell type closely mimics how that cell type is formed during embryogenesis. This developmental pathway starts with the formation of the primary germ layers, mesoderm, endoderm, and ectoderm. Progressively more differentiated cell types are formed until the functional mature cell is generated. My research program focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate endoderm and mesoderm development utilizing the in vitro differentiation of ES cells and iPS cells.

One area of interest in the lab is in investigating hematopoiesis with a focus on megakaryocyte development. We are studying the molecular pathways which regulate megakaryopoeisis with the goal of optimizing the generation of platelets in vitro from ES/iPS cells. In addition, we are developing in vitro models of platelet disorders using iPS cells derived from patients with genetic diseases affecting platelet development and function.

The second area of interest in the lab is endoderm formation. We are studying a unique endodermal stem cell population that we have generated from human ES and iPS cells. Endoderm stem cells have the ability to be expanded in culture like ES cells and have the capability to generate many endoderm derived tissues such as liver, pancreas and intestine and lung. We are studying the signaling and transcriptional pathways which regulate endoderm stem cell generation and maintenance. We are also utilizing the endodermal stem cell population as a model to study pancreatic beta cell specification with the goal of generating functional beta cells from human ES and iPS cells. Lastly, we are also using the stem cell system to model genetic forms of diabetes.

I received my PhD in Immunology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2002. My postdoctoral work was with Dr. Gordon Keller, using mouse ES cells as a model system to study directed in vitro differentiation. In 2008 I joined the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and University of Pennsylvania faculty. I am a Stem Cell Biologist, and my research laboratory studies the mechanisms that control the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into functional derivative tissues with a focus on hematopoietic lineages, lung and pancreas. I also co-direct, with Deborah French, the Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Core. This facility provides services and training on the culture and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Our facility also generates human iPS cells from patient samples and performs genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas system.

Lei Ying (Research Associate)
Amita Tiyaboonchai (Graduate Student)
Siddharth Kishore (Graduate Student)
Chiamin Liao (Postdoctoral Fellow)
Xiuli Sim (Graduate Student)
Fabian Cardenas (Graduate Student)
Somdutta Mukherjee (Graduate Student)
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